We are delighted to host local poets Doug Smith with Jane Bridges for a night of poetry.

About the Book

Selections from This Iris and Ransom Note Poems There are 8 poems that center around life with her husband of 40 years, his sudden death, and her response to it.  There are 8 poems that are made with cut-out words from magazines, which she calls ransom note poems.  These poems are inspired by classic Japanese haiku, and while they aren’t haiku, they are zen-like. 

Social Work and Other Myths These poems emerge from the writer's long experience as a social worker and community organizer. Doug Smith has worked with low income households, the afflicted, and the homeless for more than forty years. His carefully crafted work reflects that experience and conveys his hard-won insights. Writers, critics, and others have already taken notice of Social Work and Other Myths. Keith Taylor, author of The Bird While (from the Wayne State Press) says: "The poems are right. They sing beautifully, and they remember." Carol McCabe, founding Director of Avalon Housing, says: (Smith's) "eye for detail and his heart for the struggle come through with a rare combination of grit and warmth." Brian Cox, an award-winning Michigan playwright, observes that "Smith is a poet who creates an awareness that burrows into you and changes how you see." Jill Dearman, editor of Mudfish Anthology, says simply: "Smith has a great collection here. I was truly moved."

About the Author

Jane Bridges spent her early years were in Texas, New Hampshire and India and all of her adult years in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  She studied biology and taught science and English in both public and private schools.  Her husband of 40 years died suddenly in 2002 and their two children were adults at that time.  Her love of nature has taken her to wild places in the tropics. Crows and butterflies that come to her backyard are of particular interest to her.

She is grateful to many poetry teachers, including Richard Tillinghast, Marge Piercy, Gerry LaFemina, Matthew Lippman, and Zilka Joseph.  Members of Paper Kite and Tornado Wine have helped take her poems to wild places.  She has won and placed in several national contests, and has been published in The MacGuffin,  Paterson Literary Review, Margie, Sow's Ear Poetry Review, Third Wednesday, Mudfish, and elsewhere.

Local poet Douglas Smith is co-editor of Mayapple Press’s In Drought Times: Scenes from Rural and Small Town Life. He was a finalist in the 2016 Mudfish Magazine and the 2017 New Guard Knightville Poetry contests. His poetry has been published in numerous journals and publications. Smith’s latest collection of poems is Social Work and Other Myths. Award-winning Michigan playwright Brian Cox calls this work a “poignant expression of compassion. These poems beseech us to identify with the humanity in the desperate, the afflicted, the abandoned, the evicted and the exiled.. Smith is a poet who creates an awareness that burrows into you and changes how you see.”

Event Graphic: 
Event date: 
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 7:00pm
Event address: 
Westgate Shopping Center
2513 Jackson Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
Teaser Image: 
Event Type: 
Teaser Title: 
Poetry Night Featuring Doug Smith with Jane Bridges
Nov 14 2019 - 7:00pm
Westgate Shopping Center
2513 Jackson Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48103

We are delighted to host local poets Doug Smith with Jane Bridges for a night of poetry.

About the Book

Selections from This Iris and Ransom Note Poems There are 8 poems that center around life with her husband of 40 years, his sudden death, and her response to it.  There are 8 poems that are made with cut-out words from magazines, which she calls ransom note poems.  These poems are inspired by classic Japanese haiku, and while they aren’t haiku, they are zen-like. 

Social Work and Other Myths These poems emerge from the writer's long experience as a social worker and community organizer. Doug Smith has worked with low income households, the afflicted, and the homeless for more than forty years. His carefully crafted work reflects that experience and conveys his hard-won insights. Writers, critics, and others have already taken notice of Social Work and Other Myths. Keith Taylor, author of The Bird While (from the Wayne State Press) says: "The poems are right. They sing beautifully, and they remember." Carol McCabe, founding Director of Avalon Housing, says: (Smith's) "eye for detail and his heart for the struggle come through with a rare combination of grit and warmth." Brian Cox, an award-winning Michigan playwright, observes that "Smith is a poet who creates an awareness that burrows into you and changes how you see." Jill Dearman, editor of Mudfish Anthology, says simply: "Smith has a great collection here. I was truly moved."

About the Author

Jane Bridges spent her early years were in Texas, New Hampshire and India and all of her adult years in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  She studied biology and taught science and English in both public and private schools.  Her husband of 40 years died suddenly in 2002 and their two children were adults at that time.  Her love of nature has taken her to wild places in the tropics. Crows and butterflies that come to her backyard are of particular interest to her.

She is grateful to many poetry teachers, including Richard Tillinghast, Marge Piercy, Gerry LaFemina, Matthew Lippman, and Zilka Joseph.  Members of Paper Kite and Tornado Wine have helped take her poems to wild places.  She has won and placed in several national contests, and has been published in The MacGuffin,  Paterson Literary Review, Margie, Sow's Ear Poetry Review, Third Wednesday, Mudfish, and elsewhere.

Local poet Douglas Smith is co-editor of Mayapple Press’s In Drought Times: Scenes from Rural and Small Town Life. He was a finalist in the 2016 Mudfish Magazine and the 2017 New Guard Knightville Poetry contests. His poetry has been published in numerous journals and publications. Smith’s latest collection of poems is Social Work and Other Myths. Award-winning Michigan playwright Brian Cox calls this work a “poignant expression of compassion. These poems beseech us to identify with the humanity in the desperate, the afflicted, the abandoned, the evicted and the exiled.. Smith is a poet who creates an awareness that burrows into you and changes how you see.”